Pneumoperitoneum is a Cofactor
in Postoperative Adhesion Formation
after Laparoscopic Surgery

By Carlos Roger Molinas Sanabria
December 2003
Leuven University Press
ISBN: 90-6186-341-3
153 pages, Illustrated, 6 " x 9 "
$69.50 Paper Original


This is a Ph.D. dissertation. Adhesions are pathological bonds between surfaces within body cavities. These bonds can be a thin film of connective tissue, a thick fibrous bridge containing blood vessels and nerve tissue, or a direct contact between two organ surfaces. Adhesions can be found in abdominal, pericardial, pleural, uterine and joint cavities, and in the chamber of the eyes. Adhesions in the abdominal cavity are also known as intraperitoneal or peritoneal adhesions because the peritoneum is always involved.

Contents include: General introduction, General Materials and Methods, C02 pneumoperitoneum is a cofactor in adhesion formation in rabbits and mice, C02 pneumoperitoneum enhances adhesion formation through peritoneal hypoxia: I. Role of hypoxia inducible factors, C02 pneumoperitoneum enhances adhesion formation through peritoneal hypoxia: II. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor, C02 pneumoperitoneum enhances adhesion formation through peritoneal hypoxia: III. Role of the plasminogen system, Role of C02 pneumoperitoneum-induced acidosis in C02 pneumoperitoneum-enhanced formation, Addition of oxygen to the C02 pneumoperitoneum: I. Dose-response effect upon adhesion formation, Addition of oxygen to the C02 pneumoperitoneum: II. Effect upon C02 absorption, General Discussion.

Obstetrics
Acta Biomedica Lovaniensia, No. 300

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