Social Protection, Globalised


By Jos Berghman, et al.
June 2005
Leuven University Press
ISBN: 9058674460
202 pages, Illustrated, 6 " x 9 "
$49.50 Paper Original


Globalization has arguably been one of the most widely used and controversial concepts in the social science and political debates over the last few years. The definition, causation and socio-economic effects of globalization are much in dispute among academics, politicians and journalists alike. Whatever their particular position, however, few observers would disagree that significant developments in the direction of greater global economic integration have occurred.

As a result, much of the globalization debate has focused on its economic dimension. While some observers welcome neo-liberal economic globalization as a beneficial development that offers tremendous possibilities for social and economic progress in both developed and developing countries, others fear that it will produce harmful socio-economic consequences for both individuals and society at large. Across the world, globalization is increasingly perceived as a threat for established levels of human welfare and held responsible for social disintegration.

PARTIAL CONTENTS:

Social Protection in a Globalizing Economy:
Challenges for Social Protection

Globalization--myth or reality?
Increased for social protection.
Incapacity of states to socially protect.
What are the challenges for social policy?
Problems for mobile workers.

Worker Mobility & Social Protection
Transitional migrants. Global migrants. Industrial migrants.
Statutory social security schemes.
Complementary social insurances.

Latin America Pension Reform
Globalization & pension reform.
Design features of reformed pension system.
Old age income security.

Low Income Countries: The Case of Cote d'Ivoire
Social security arrangements.
Integration & social security financing.

Sub-Saharan Africa
Social security--reasons for exclusion.
Household-based and organization-based systems.
Strengthening the informal economic & social security sector.

A Blueprint for Global Social Security Policy
Altered balance between capital and labor.
Ideology.
Growing income inequality.
The human damage theory.

Social Security as a Fundamental Right?
International labor organization.
United Nations.
Council of Europe.
European Union.
Africa.
South America.
The ILO Convention.
Binding power of 14 ECHR.


Sociology; Welfare
Sociology Today, Vol. 9

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